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History

This course is a survey of world history. During fall semester, the emphasis will be on prehistory and ancient civilizations, primarily the cultures of the Ancient Near East, cultures of the Far East, Greece, and Rome. The semester will conclude with a brief survey Medieval Europe. The spring semester will commence with an analysis of the history of Islam and conclude with a survey of the absolutists governments of Europe in the 17th century. While attention will be paid to non-Western cultures, the bulk of the study will focus on the development of Western Civilization and its impact on the world. The study will be conducted using the perspective of a Biblical Worldview.

This course is a survey of world history. During the first semester, the emphasis will be on early modern Europe during the Enlightenment through the 19th century.  The spring semester will commence with an analysis of WWI and the Marxist revolution in Russia and end with a survey of the contemporary world.  While attention will be paid to non-Western cultures, the bulk of the study will focus on the development of Western Civilization and its impact on the world. The study will be conducted using the perspective of a Biblical Worldview.

This course is a survey of American History. During the fall semester, the course will survey the historical development of the United States from European colonization through the Spanish American War. The spring semester will commence with an overview of America’s economic and political status at the turn of the century and conclude with a review of American politics since Vietnam. The study will be conducted using the perspective of a Biblical Worldview.

This course is designed to provide students with the analytic skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with the problems and materials in U.S. History. The program prepares students for intermediate and advanced college courses by making demands upon them equivalent to those made by full-year introductory college courses. Students should learn to assess historical materials-their relevance to a given interpretive problem, reliability, and importance-and to weigh the evidence and interpretations presented in historical scholarship. This AP U.S. History course should thus develop the skills necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of an informed judgment and to present reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively in essay format.

Government: This course will provide a survey of American Government. Students will begin by analyzing the philosophical foundation of American Government and comparing and contrasting that perspective with a Biblical Worldview. Students will then survey the three branches of government as detailed in the Constitution as well as the evolution of government since the 18th century. The course will conclude with a simulation of the American criminal justice process through participation in a Mock Trial.

Economics: The focus will be on grasping the vocabulary and logic of the economic process and synthesizing that information with a Biblical worldview. The Biblical rationale for conservative economics will be contrasted with more liberal radical alternatives throughout the semester.

Teachers

 
Mr. Bradford Poston
 
 
Mrs. Jodi Wilkerson